Switching from Feedburner to AWeber for my email newsletter

Thursday, June 30, 2011

This is just a brief post to let my readers know that I’m switching from Feedburner Email’s service to AWeber to handle sending out my posts and other content via email. Why am I switching? Because AWeber offers countless features that we plan to use to better inform you our readers of the exciting new things we've been working on . This change will only affect email subscribers. My RSS Feed will still be handled by Feedburner.
With Feedburner’s email service for example, I have no control over the emails that are sent out. With AWeber I’ll be able to create a newsletter service that not only sends out the posts I publish on this blog, but it will also allow me to send out custom written emails. Emails with exclusive offers, dates for upcoming Workshops and info on new books we are working on.
If you currently subscribe to my email newsletter via Feedburner you’re subscription will automatically be imported to AWeber and you will receive an email asking you to confirm the subscription. Unless you click on the activation link in that email, you will not be added to the new newsletter service. This is because the new newsletter has a double opt-in confirmation feature enabled. Starting tomorrow Feedburner’s email service will be disabled, as AWeber steps in to take over.
I invite you to join my newsletter by providing your first name and email address in the email sign-up on the right hand side bar.
Thank you to all those who have or will sign up.


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About This Blog

blog (blŏg, bläg) n. 1. short for Weblog 2. online personal journal with reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks provided by the writer 3. diary that is posted on the Internet 4. an experiment to verbalize my observations about the status of photography. It will be eclectic & deal with philosophy & practice of this universal art form. It will strive for periodic commentary about issues many photographers face, like ownership and the economy. It will also talk about pictures and what makes good ones and how to get them. No hardware. No software. No recycled clichés. No whining.